JOCELYN YUN

AIGA @ UT



Public Relations
Social Media
American Institute of Graphic Arts is a professional organization for communicaton designers. At the University of Texas, we invite speakers to talk to students, arrange mentorships from local designers, and provide workshops all through the AIGA organization.

I had the opportunity to be the Public Relations officer and collaborate with an amazing team of designers. As a PR, I got to make some cool graphics advertising meetings and promoting events.



FEB. 5
THE LETTERMAKER


FEB. 19
STICKER MAKING









AIGA POSTER SHOW



Brand + Identity
Web Design

Social


MADE WITH
Annette Hui
Alexis Garcia
Kate Jones
For the 2019-2020 school year, a group of designers and I planned to establish the first AIGA Poster Show at the University of Texas. After ideating on different themes and arranging a physical exhibition space, our plans were ultimately foiled by the emergence of COVID-19. We discarded our previous arrangements and shifted to a digital space where we asked students to create posters in response to the pandemic.

A collection of student posters reflecting their adjusted lives, AIGA presents: THE POSTER SHOW










One of my responsibilities for this project was to construct and stylize a website to showcase the work of 33 students. The burnt orange color, the monospace typeface, and the gritty, vibrating motion of the website were carefully selected to reflect the daunting and sudden transition to online school and isolation.










In addition to the website, I created promotional graphics that were featured on the AIGA social media page. These posts were inspired by the glitching windows and urgent messages caused by viruses on old computers⁠—design imitating life.










Even though board members were excluded from the judging process, we all submitted posters just for fun. I created a poster about my feelings of regression during the pandemic. Inspired by old vocabulary charts my parents used to teach me korean when I was younger, I created a “wholesome” chart to help teach kids about the pandemic.